Where academic philosophy went wrong

Very interesting article on the deflation of philosophical pretention and the closure of the philosophical mind. Philosophy can be done differently, and perhaps elsewhere than in the academy. See also my previous posts: https://terenceblake.wordpress.com/2014/08/20/transcendental-cronyism-as-the-interruption-of-the-philosophical-voyage/ and https://terenceblake.wordpress.com/2014/08/21/on-infinite-debt-and-circles-of-mutual-acknowledgement/

Huenemanniac

A potted history:

I believe Peter Sloterdijk is right that the Enlightenment has been followed by philosophical cynicism, or an impressive array of natural knowledge unaccompanied by any faith in providence. The U.S., which became the dominant intellectual and cultural force in the course of the 20th century, was well-suited to put this cynicism to work: for America was built upon a pragmatic, “can do” attitude, and seemed ready to let expediency drive ideology . (There are probably interesting connections here to Protestantism and Holland of the 17th century.) And so there arose on American shores the fulfillment of the German idea of a research university, with its faculty as a specialized workforce and its students as Model-Ts rumbling down an assembly line on which three credits of this and three credits of that are bolted on to each chassis.

 Each academic discipline became a guild or union, where…

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