GRATITUDE OF A LONESOME BLOGGER: on readers’ friendliness, sobriety and restraint

I am of course very grateful to the people who leave comments on my blog, regularly or sporadically, and hope they will continue. But I am also thankful to those who do not comment, who content themselves (and me) with a simple “like” or even no visible sign at all. Often there is not much to say, a perception or an affect are shared, and that is enough.

Sometimes I see other philosophy blogs with piles of comments, but I cannot feel jealous. Most show no restraint, just jostling for attention, sounding off and opining about things having nothing to do with the original post, showing off their superior knowledge. So many noisy unproductive comments sections – unfriendly places.

Some people have told me they read my blog from time to time, out of affectionate curiosity to see what a friend is saying. Non-philosophy is also that, warm-hearted no comment.

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4 Responses to GRATITUDE OF A LONESOME BLOGGER: on readers’ friendliness, sobriety and restraint

  1. Naxos says:

    The trick is to not create expectations with regards to whether your posts will be commented or not, otherwise one ends up generating an affective debt for oneself, while good comments today are few and rare. In the same sense, when someone makes a comment that space in your blog gets filled, and this is something always nice to see. But not all comments are meaning to start an exchange or a conversation. Besides, when the comments get too regular, one ends up writing and composing the issues with respect to the possible comments that might emerge, so as to generate attraction and reaction. As I see it, this is the worst thing that can happen to a philosophical blog. There are some known examples which by now are not even worth to mention.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Conversation in AGENT SWARM |

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