“Beyond the Analytic-continental Divide: Pluralist Philosophy in the Twenty-first Century”

This could well be the title for my blog, or even for 45 years or so of my philosophical life (I have always been a precursor). However, Beyond the Analytic-continental Divide: Pluralist Philosophy in the Twenty-first Century is in fact the title of a forthcoming book, edited by Jeffrey Bell, Andrew Cutrofello, and Paul M. Livingston. The book’s title and the blurb are more interesting than the table of contents. I think that in all modesty, the publication of a book with this title is one of the many indirect effects of this blog.

I almost felt ripped off, but then I saw that the only “pluralist philosophy” involved is a “pluralistic synthesis of what is best in both traditions”, i.e. a plurality of philosophies. The table of contents shows no trace of taking into consideration those contemporary pluralist thinkers, for example Bruno Latour, who treat the much discussed divide as an amusing dogma created from elevating differences due to socio-economic considerations into conceptual distinctions.

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6 Responses to “Beyond the Analytic-continental Divide: Pluralist Philosophy in the Twenty-first Century”

  1. I’m beginning to suspect that the constant injunction to “overcome the opposition” between analytical and Continental philosophy is in fact contributing to the continuation of that opposition, by making it seem like the alternative is some sort of tepid synthesis or bridging of the two “traditions”.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What do you think about some current continental philosophers such as Graham Harman arguing that we should actively try to widen the gap between the two ‘traditions’?

    Liked by 1 person

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